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Wednesday, March 30

  1. page space.menu edited ... The Little Prince A Flower is a Serious Matter The Fox's Secret
    ...
    The Little Prince
    A Flower is a Serious Matter
    The Fox's Secret
    (view changes)
    7:59 am
  2. page The Fox's Secret edited {little_prince_fox.jpg} ‘”Goodbye,’ said the fox. ‘Here is my secret. It’s quite simple: One sees …
    {little_prince_fox.jpg} ‘”Goodbye,’ said the fox. ‘Here is my secret. It’s quite simple: One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes...It’s the time that you spent on your rose that makes your rose so important. . . . People have forgotten this truth,’ the fox said, ‘but you mustn’t forget it. You become responsible for what you’ve tamed. You’re responsible for your rose...’
    ...
    by everyone.
    “I was surprised by suddenly understanding that mysterious radiance of the sands. When I was a little boy I lived in an old house, and there was a legend that a treasure was buried in it somewhere. Of course, no one was ever able to find the treasure, perhaps no one even searched. But it cast a spell over the whole house.”
    This passage from Chapter XXIV is when the narrator grasps the message told by the fox for himself. Saint-Exupéry delivers his lessona early on, unlike most fables where the moral is given at the very end, so that the narrator can experience it for himself. A moral serves no purpose if it is not fully explored and lived out, the narrator repeats the process of understanding once again, showing us that even when we think we understand something, there is always more to learn.
    (view changes)
    7:59 am
  3. page The Fox's Secret edited {little_prince_fox.jpg} ‘”Goodbye,’ said the fox. ‘Here is my secret. It’s quite simple: One sees…
    {little_prince_fox.jpg} ‘”Goodbye,’ said the fox. ‘Here is my secret. It’s quite simple: One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes...It’s the time that you spent on your rose that makes your rose so important. . . . People have forgotten this truth,’ the fox said, ‘but you mustn’t forget it. You become responsible for what you’ve tamed. You’re responsible for your rose...’
    The quotation explicitly states the central moral of The Little Prince. The Prince has learned these lessons on his own, but the fox explicitly state it for him to make it clear. The lesson that the fox teaches is a secret because it is not available to everyone, but it must be learned eventually by everyone.
    “I was surprised by suddenly understanding that mysterious radiance of the sands. When I was a little boy I lived in an old house, and there was a legend that a treasure was buried in it somewhere. Of course, no one was ever able to find the treasure, perhaps no one even searched. But it cast a spell over the whole house.”
    This passage from Chapter XXIV is when the narrator grasps the message told by the fox for himself. Saint-Exupéry delivers his lessona early on, unlike most fables where the moral is given at the very end, so that the narrator can experience it for himself. A moral serves no purpose if it is not fully explored and lived out, the narrator repeats the process of understanding once again, showing us that even when we think we understand something, there is always more to learn.

    (view changes)
    7:58 am
  4. 7:58 am
  5. page A Flower is a Serious Matter edited {Litte_Prince_Flower.jpg} “If someone loves a flower of which just one example exists among all th…
    {Litte_Prince_Flower.jpg} “If someone loves a flower of which just one example exists among all the millions and millions of stars, that’s enough to make him happy when he looks at the stars. He tells himself, ‘My flower’s up there somewhere. . . .’ But if the sheep eats the flower, then for him it’s as if, suddenly, all the stars went out and that isn’t important?”
    This is the Little Prince’s response to when the narrator tells him that roses are not a “serious matter.” This response shows that he believes that the restricted priorities of grown-ups is silly. He points out the adults stress over routine and material possessions when question regarding relationships and the universe are more valuable and important.
    ...
    is most important.important:"Look up at the sky. Ask yourself, 'Has the sheep eaten the flower or not?' And you’ll see how everything changes. . . . And no grown-up will ever understand how such a thing could be so important!".
    (view changes)
    7:45 am
  6. page space.menu edited ... Drinking Anti-English Guilt Malachy McCourt The Little Prince A Flower is a Serious Ma…
    ...
    Drinking
    Anti-English
    Guilt
    Malachy McCourt

    The Little Prince
    A Flower is a Serious Matter
    (view changes)
    7:43 am
  7. page A Flower is a Serious Matter edited {Litte_Prince_Flower.jpg} “If someone loves a flower of which just one example exists among all th…
    {Litte_Prince_Flower.jpg} “If someone loves a flower of which just one example exists among all the millions and millions of stars, that’s enough to make him happy when he looks at the stars. He tells himself, ‘My flower’s up there somewhere. . . .’ But if the sheep eats the flower, then for him it’s as if, suddenly, all the stars went out and that isn’t important?”
    ...
    and important.
    At firsts this statement seems naive, because of course the pilot fixing his engine is more important than questions about the universe. However, as the novel progresses the truth behind the Little Prince’s statement becomes evident. Upon the return home of the Little Prince the narrator looks up at the sky and becomes emotional about whether of not the sheep has eaten the helpless flower. The narrator’s perspective on the sky has changed completely, showing that a person perspective is most important.

    (view changes)
    7:42 am
  8. page A Flower is a Serious Matter edited {Litte_Prince_Flower.jpg} “If someone loves a flower of which just one example exists among all t…
    {Litte_Prince_Flower.jpg} “If someone loves a flower of which just one example exists among all the millions and millions of stars, that’s enough to make him happy when he looks at the stars. He tells himself, ‘My flower’s up there somewhere. . . .’ But if the sheep eats the flower, then for him it’s as if, suddenly, all the stars went out and that isn’t important?”
    This is the Little Prince’s response to when the narrator tells him that roses are not a “serious matter.” This response shows that he believes that the restricted priorities of grown-ups is silly. He points out the adults stress over routine and material possessions when question regarding relationships and the universe are more valuable and important.
    At firsts this statement seems naive, because of course the pilot fixing his engine is more important than questions about the universe. However, as the novel progresses the truth behind the Little Prince’s statement becomes evident. Upon the return home of the Little Prince the narrator looks up at the sky and becomes emotional about whether of not the sheep has eaten the helpless flower. The narrator’s perspective on the sky has changed completely, showing that a person perspective is most important.

    (view changes)
    7:42 am
  9. page Anti-English edited In {irish-flag-640.jpg} In Angela’s Ashes ... Frank McCourt.
    In {irish-flag-640.jpg} In Angela’s Ashes
    ...
    Frank McCourt.
    (view changes)
    7:25 am

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